Next Tuesday, March 14, Karen Joy Fowler speaks at the University of Kansas:

Exploring and Expanding Gender in Speculative Fiction: The Tiptree Award at 25.”

The Gunn Center for the Study of Science Fiction and the University of Kansas Department of English are delighted to bring world-renowned author Karen Joy Fowler to KU to offer this year’s Richard W. Gunn Lecture, “Exploring and Expanding Gender in Speculative Fiction: The Tiptree Award at 25.”

Karen Joy Fowler is the author of author of six novels and three short story collections. Her most recent novel, WE ARE ALL COMPLETELY BESIDE OURSELVES, won the 2013 PEN/Faulkner, the California Book Award, and was shortlisted for the Man Booker in 2014. She has won the Nebula and World Fantasy awards, and this year she will be the Guest of Honor at World Fantasy in San Antonio.

Among her many achievements, Fowler co-founded the James Tiptree, Jr. Literary Award, first announced at the 1991 WisCon, the world’s only feminist-oriented science fiction convention. For 25 years, the Tiptree prize has been awarded annually to a work of science fiction or fantasy that contemplates shifts in gender roles in ways that are particularly thought-provoking, imaginative, and perhaps even infuriating. The lecture will provide an extraordinary opportunity to hear from a pioneer thinker about the relation between feminism, gender, and speculative fiction, from one of the most important and accomplished writers working in the field today.

She lives in Santa Cruz, California where she is currently pretending to write a new book.

Facebook event page.

The event is free and open to the public.

When:
Tuesday, March 14, 2017
7:00pm  - 8:00pm

Where:
Jayhawk Room
Kansas Memorial Union
University of Kansas campus
Lawrence, KS 66045

Cost:
Free

Everyone is welcome!

James Gunn will read from and sign his new novel Transcendental this afternoon (Wednesday, Oct. 9), in the Jayhawk Ink Bookstore from 4:00pm-5:30pm. Transcendental is an alien Canterbury Tales-Origin of Species-New Space Opera mashup, full of ideas and wonder.


Come get a copy of his wonderful new novel that Frederik Pohl called, "his best yet, and in it he demonstrates his possession of one of the most finely developed skills at world-building (and at aliens-creating to populate those worlds) in science fiction today. Read it!"

James Gunn's newest novel, out now
from Tor Books. Click for full-size slipcover art (.pdf).


James Gunn, photographed in 2013 by Jason Dailey.

*An extra Campbell Conference treat at the Spencer Research Library this Friday*

A special selection of materials from the Spencer science fiction collection will be on display in their Johnson room from 9:00am - 4:45pm this Friday, June 14. Anyone who is interested is welcome to stop by and see these rare items.

And, if you ask about the SF display at the front desk when you enter the building, Special Collections Librarian Elspeth Healey will come out and personally tour you around the items, so don't miss this great opportunity! 

Best,
Chris

The Gunn Center for the Study of Science Fiction's summer program is in its second week of workshops (both long and short-form), and this Friday through Sunday we host our annual Campbell Conference. A quick overview of events:

  • Best-selling SF author Kevin J. Anderson kicks off the Conference on Friday afternoon with a talk about dreaming big and making unrealistic expectations pay off.
  • On Friday evening, the Awards Ceremony and Banquet honors the winners of the John W. Campbell Memorial Award, Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award, and brand-new "Lifeboat to the Stars" Award, followed by a reception.
  • Saturday morning's round-table discussion theme is "To the Stars," where we will explore SF's long relationship with off-planet travel, its promises, and the future of the human race as a galactic species. We will also discuss the important steps along the path to the stars.
  • During lunch break on Saturday, get your books signed by this year's guest authors and editors at a mass autographing session. The bookstore has volumes for everyone on hand.
  • On Saturday afternoon, hear readings from Kevin J. Anderson, Andy Duncan, and James Gunn.
  • Saturday evening sees a special screening of the new Kevin Willmott film, Destination: Planet Negro!, followed by a Q&A with the director and cinematographer Matthew Jacobson. Afterward is another reception.
  • Sunday morning is an informal "meet the authors and editors" session, followed by an informal reception off-campus sponsored by Kansas City in 2016, a bid for the 74th Worldcon.

Due to a family emergency, Robert J. Sawyer is unable to attend this year's Campbell Conference.

To learn more about our events and guests, visit the Conference page: http://www.sfcenter.ku.edu/campbell-conference.htm

And please help spread the word!

Best,
Chris

Center for the Study of Science Fiction press release on the News page here.

Science-fiction author, journalist, technology activist, and Boing Boing co-editor Cory Doctorow presents this year's Richard W. Gunn Memorial Lecture:

"The Coming War on General Purpose Computing:
Every single political issue will end up rehashing the stupid Internet copyright fight."

When:
Thursday, February 28, 2013
7:30pm - 9:30pm

Where:
Alderson Auditorium
University of Kansas Student Union
Lawrence, KS 66045

Cost:
Free! Seating is limited, so arrive early to ensure a spot.

Jayhawk Ink bookstore will have copies of several of Doctorow's books available to purchase in Alderson Auditorium (as well as the bookstore on Level 2) and get signed by the author after the talk.

This is Doctorow's third visit to KU: first in 1999 when his story "Craphound" (his first published story) was a finalist for the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award, and next in 2009 when his novel Little Brother won the John W. Campbell Memorial Award.

Don't miss hearing one of the most interesting thinkers of our time talk about some of our most-relevant issues! Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Science Fiction and the KU Department of English.

Bio:
Cory Doctorow is a science fiction author, activist, journalist, and technology activist. He is the co-editor of the popular weblog Boing Boing, and a contributor to The Guardian, the New York Times, Publishers Weekly, Wired, and many other newspapers, magazines, and websites. He was formerly Director of European Affairs for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a non-profit civil-liberties group that defends freedom in technology law, policy, standards, and treaties. He holds an honorary doctorate in computer science from the Open University (UK), where he is a Visiting Senior Lecturer; in 2007, he served as the Fulbright Chair at the Annenberg Center for Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California.

Doctorow's novels have been translated into dozens of languages and are published by Tor Books and simultaneously released on the Internet under Creative Commons licenses that encourage their re-use and sharing, a move that increases his sales by enlisting his readers to help promote his work. His work has won the Locus, Sunburst, Ontario Library White Pine, Prometheus, Indienet, and John W. Campbell Memorial awards, and been nominated for the Hugo, Nebula, Theodore Sturgeon Memorial (for "Craphound"), and British Science Fiction Awards. His latest young-adult novel is Pirate Cinema, a story of mashup guerillas who declare war on the entertainment industry. His latest novel for adults is Rapture of the Nerds, written with Charles Stross and published in 2012. His New York Times Bestseller Little Brother was published in 2008. A sequel, Homeland, was just published. His latest short story collection is With a Little Help, available in paperback, ebook, audiobook and limited edition hardcover. In 2011, Tachyon Books published a collection of his essays, called Context: Further Selected Essays on Productivity, Creativity, Parenting, and Politics in the 21st Century (with an introduction by Tim O'Reilly) and IDW published a collection of graphic stories inspired by his short fiction called Cory Doctorow's Futuristic Tales of the Here and Now. The Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow, a PM Press Outspoken Authors chapbook, was also published in 2011.

He co-founded the open-source peer-to-peer software company OpenCola, sold to OpenText, Inc in 2003, and presently serves on the boards and advisory boards of the Participatory Culture Foundation, the Clarion Foundation, The Glenn Gould Foundation, and the Chabot Space & Science Center's SpaceTime project.

In 2007, Entertainment Weekly called him, "The William Gibson of his generation." He was also named one of Forbes Magazine's 2007/8/9/10 Web Celebrities, and one of the World Economic Forum's Young Global Leaders for 2007.
Born in Toronto, Canada, he now lives in London.

The Lecture Series:
The Gunn Lecture, endowed by Dr. Richard W. Gunn, James Gunn's brother, has featured several science-fiction scholars. Although it has also sponsored speakers on Shakespeare and Ralph Ellison, it often brings distinguished science-fiction scholars to the campus beginning with scholar Fredric Jameson, William A. Lane Professor at Duke University; and continuing with Bill Brown, Edgar Carson Waller Professor at the University of Chicago; China Miéville, British author of what has become known as the New Weird; and Nöel Sturgeon, Theodore Sturgeon's daughter and trustee of his literary estate, Professor of Critical Cultures, Gender, and Race Studies at Washington State University, and juror on the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award. The Center also recently co-sponsored a visit from Michael Chabon, prize-winning author and editor.

Promotional materials:
KU Calendar news item here.
SFWA news item here.
Facebook event page here.
Google+ event page here.
Yelp event page here.

Press release on the CSSF News page here.

Posters in .pdf format (other formats on the News page):

Feel free to use these images and posters on your websites, share them around, remix them to help promote the talk, and so forth!

If you are unfamiliar with Doctorow's work and would like to get acquainted with it, here's a short reader (from the CSSF "Science, Technology, & Society" course) - all available free online:

Short story, “I, Robot.”
Short-short story, “Printcrime.”
Chapter 4 from the Campbell Award-winning novel, Little Brother.
    Want to read more Doctorow stories? Novels? See the recommended reading, below.
Essay, “I Can't Let You Do That, Dave: What it means to design our computers and devices to disobey us.”
Essay, “Disorganised but effective: The most profound social revolutions in human history have arisen whenever a technology comes along that lowers transaction costs for everyone.”
Essay, “Internet copyright law has to have public support if it's going to work.”
Essay, “A Vocabulary for Speaking about the Future.”

Want to read more Doctorow articles and essays? Here's some more recommended reading to become familiar with his work:

Please help get the word out, and I hope to see you there!

Best,
Chris
Tags:

Author, journalist, technology activist, and Boing Boing co-editor Cory Doctorow presents this year's Richard W. Gunn Memorial Lecture:

"The Coming War on General Purpose Computing:
Every single political issue will end up rehashing the stupid Internet copyright fight."

For immediate release (.doc version here)

When:
Thursday, February 28, 2013
7:30pm - 9:30pm

Where:
Alderson Auditorium
University of Kansas Student Union
Lawrence, KS 66045

Cost:
Free! Seating is limited, so arrive early to ensure a spot.

Jayhawk Ink bookstore will have copies of several of Doctorow's books available to purchase in Alderson Auditorium (as well as the bookstore on Level 2) and get signed by the author after the talk.

This is Doctorow's third visit to KU: first in 1999 when his story "Craphound" (his first published story) was a finalist for the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award, and next in 2009 when his novel Little Brother won the John W. Campbell Memorial Award.

Don't miss hearing one of the most interesting thinkers of our time talk about some of our most-relevant issues!


Bio:

Cory Doctorow is a science fiction author, activist, journalist, and technology activist. He is the co-editor of the popular weblog Boing Boing, and a contributor to The Guardian, the New York Times, Publishers Weekly, Wired, and many other newspapers, magazines, and websites. He was formerly Director of European Affairs for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a non-profit civil-liberties group that defends freedom in technology law, policy, standards, and treaties. He holds an honorary doctorate in computer science from the Open University (UK), where he is a Visiting Senior Lecturer; in 2007, he served as the Fulbright Chair at the Annenberg Center for Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California.

Doctorow's novels have been translated into dozens of languages and are published by Tor Books and simultaneously released on the Internet under Creative Commons licenses that encourage their re-use and sharing, a move that increases his sales by enlisting his readers to help promote his work. His work has won the Locus, Sunburst, Ontario Library White Pine, Prometheus, Indienet, and John W. Campbell Memorial awards, and been nominated for the Hugo, Nebula, Theodore Sturgeon Memorial (for "Craphound"), and British Science Fiction Awards. His latest young-adult novel is Pirate Cinema, a story of mashup guerillas who declare war on the entertainment industry. His latest novel for adults is Rapture of the Nerds, written with Charles Stross and published in 2012. His New York Times Bestseller Little Brother was published in 2008. A sequel, Homeland, was just published. His latest short story collection is With a Little Help, available in paperback, ebook, audiobook and limited edition hardcover. In 2011, Tachyon Books published a collection of his essays, called Context: Further Selected Essays on Productivity, Creativity, Parenting, and Politics in the 21st Century (with an introduction by Tim O'Reilly) and IDW published a collection of comic books inspired by his short fiction called Cory Doctorow's Futuristic Tales of the Here and Now. The Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow, a PM Press Outspoken Authors chapbook, was also published in 2011.

He co-founded the open source peer-to-peer software company OpenCola, sold to OpenText, Inc in 2003, and presently serves on the boards and advisory boards of the Participatory Culture Foundation, the Clarion Foundation, The Glenn Gould Foundation, and the Chabot Space & Science Center's SpaceTime project.

In 2007, Entertainment Weekly called him, "The William Gibson of his generation." He was also named one of Forbes Magazine's 2007/8/9/10 Web Celebrities, and one of the World Economic Forum's Young Global Leaders for 2007.

Born in Toronto, Canada, he now lives in London.


The Lecture Series:

The Gunn Lecture, endowed by Dr. Richard W. Gunn, James Gunn's brother, has featured several science-fiction scholars. Although it has also sponsored speakers on Shakespeare and Ralph Ellison, it often brings distinguished science-fiction scholars to the campus beginning with scholar Fredric Jameson, William A. Lane Professor at Duke University; and continuing with Bill Brown, Edgar Carson Waller Professor at the University of Chicago; China Miéville, British author of what has become known as the New Weird; and Nöel Sturgeon, Theodore Sturgeon's daughter and trustee of his literary estate, Professor of Critical Cultures, Gender, and Race Studies at Washington State University, and juror on the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award. The Center also recently co-sponsored a visit from Michael Chabon, prize-winning author and editor.

KU Calendar news item here.

Facebook Event page here.

Getting to teach science fiction EVERY SEMESTER as the primary focus of my job. LOVE. Here's one of the courses I look forward to teaching all year, offered in the Spring at KU:

English 507: "Science, Technology, and Society: Examining the Future Through a Science Fiction Lens." Science and technology offer countless benefits to individuals and to societies, yet they also present many challenges. This course explores the past, present, and possible future effects of science and technology on society through readings and discussions of nonfiction articles in conjunction with science-fiction stories and novels. Each week, students write a short respone to that week's readings. Other projects include a mid-term research paper, a live presentation, and a research paper or creative work as a final project.

Speaking of classes I love to teach, back to grading interesting and insightful papers for English 506/690: "Literature of Science Fiction: The Short Story." Of the five grad students I have in this course, three are creative-writing MFA students, one is English lit, and another from a different department altogether. Makes for good discussions!

Chris
This post is for you science-lovers out there... that's everyone who likes heat in the winter, A/C in the summer, cell phones, food, modern roads... you get the idea. But especially for those who love contemplating the universe and our place in it, here are two things I must share. First, an event:

Did you know that the KU Natural History Museum hosts a series called, "Science on Tap"? Next Tuesday evening, October 16, the event is called "Dark Matter, Dark Energy and the Expanding Universe." It's held at Free State Brewery from 7:30pm - 9:00pm. Description:

More than a decade after the Nobel-prize-winning discovery about the accelerating expansion of the universe, scientists are still trying to pin down exactly what dark energy is and solve one of the most profound questions in modern physics. This mysterious force repels gravity and is estimated to account for about 70 percent of the substance of the universe. For this Science on Tap, Bharat Ratra of Kansas State University will discuss dark matter, dark energy, and how scientists understand these components of the ever-expanding universe.

Sounds fantastic. I'll be there!

Speaking of things that fill me with joy, Neil deGrasse Tyson is my hero. Check it out:

Everyone should hear these wise words - especially our world leaders.

Chris

Click the image to see the full-size poster
Several area authors whose stories appear in the upcoming anthology, Aftermaths, will read from and discuss the new book, including James Gunn, Christopher McKitterick, M.C. Chambers, Karin Rita Gastreich, and Hadley Rille Books editor Eric T. Reynolds.

Just in time for Earth Day!

There's also a Facebook event, "Down to Earth 2012," where you can join.

Details:

When:
Friday, April 13, 4:00pm - 5:30pm

Where:
Jayhawk Ink Bookstore, Kansas Union level 2, 1301 Jayhawk Blvd, Lawrence, KS
Tags:
Reminder about an upcoming CSSF talk! Nöel Sturgeon will give this year's Richard W. Gunn Memorial Lecture, "Avatar and Activism: Ecological Indians, Disabling Militarism, and Science Fiction Imaginaries."

Nöel is Theodore Sturgeon's daughter and trustee of his literary estate; Professor of Critical Cultures, Gender, and Race Studies at Washington State University; and a juror for the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award.

When:
Monday, March 5
7:00pm - 8:00pm

Where:
Malott Room in the University of Kansas Student Union
Lawrence, Kansas

The Gunn Lecture, endowed by Dr. Richard W. Gunn, James Gunn's brother, has featured several science-fiction scholars. Although it has also sponsored speakers on Shakespeare and Ralph Ellison, it has brought a distinguished group of science-fiction experts to the campus beginning with scholar Fredric Jameson, William A. Lane Professor at Duke University, and continuing with Bill Brown, Edgar Carson Waller Professor at the University of Chicago, and China Miéville, British author of what has become known as “the New Weird.” Michael Chabon, prize-winning science-fiction and mainstream author and editor, also recently presented a Humanities lecture at KU.

Spread the word!

Chris

Hey, Lawrence-area folks, whatcha doing next Monday afternoon? Come to John C. Tibbetts' horror-themed book-release party! There'll be readings (from John, James Gunn, Ben Cartwright, and me), costumes, video snippets, and more! Oh, and you can get books signed, too. No cost (unless you buy a book, natch).

Hope to see you there!


Click the image to see the KU Bookstore page.

Best,
Chris

Kij Johnson reading and signing at Jayhawk Ink Bookstore in the Kansas Memorial Union, 1:30pm - 3:00pm.
Click the image to see Jayhawk Ink Bookstore info.

Kij's work has made the final lists for several awards, including the Nebula, Hugo, and World Fantasy awards. In 2001, she won the International Association for the Fantastic in the Art’s Crawford Award for best new fantasy novelist of the year, when her novel The Fox Woman was published. Her novel, Fudoki,
was a finalist for the 2003 James Tiptree, Jr. Award and the 2004 Mythopoeic Fantasy Award, and was a finalist for the World Fantasy Award. Kij was an author guest of honor for the 2005 SFRA conference in Las Vegas. In 2009, her story, "26 Monkeys, Also the Abyss" won the World Fantasy Award; in 2010, her story, "Spar" (note: Not for young readers) won theNebula Award; and in 2011 her story "Ponies" also won the Nebula Award.

Her novels include two volumes of the Heian trilogy Love/War/Death: The Fox Woman and Fudoki. She has also co-written with Greg Cox a Star Trek: The Next Generation novel, Dragon's Honor; and an e-book anthology of her short fiction, Tales for the Long Rains, is currently available from Scorpius Digital. She is currently writing a third novel set in Heian Japan; and Kylen, two novels set in Georgian Britain.

The Jayhawk Ink Bookstore is in the Kansas Union at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, KS. Hope to see you there!

Chris
Tags:
Here's a don't-miss event tomorrow night at KU:

Tuesday April 19
6:30pm - 9:30pm
University of Kansas Student Union Ballroom, Level 5

Author Michael Byers discusses his novel, Percival's Planet, which was inspired by the true story of Kansan and noted astronomer Clyde Tombaugh, discoverer of Pluto. Byers talk will be introduced by Steven A. Hawley, KU Professor of Physics and Astronomy and former NASA astronaut.

The Ballroom event will also feature a guided astronomy display including Tombaugh artifacts, presented from 6:30 p.m. by the KU Department of Physics and Astronomy. Following the talk, Michael Byers will sign his books. Click here to read a sample from his book, published in the New York Times.

The event will conclude with a telescope viewing session on the Kansas Union 6th floor deck (weather permitting).


Click the image to see more about Pluto.

I'll be there right after class!

Best,
Chris
Tags:
Here's a don't-miss event tomorrow night at KU:

Tuesday April 19
6:30pm - 9:30pm
University of Kansas Student Union Ballroom, Level 5

Author Michael Byers discusses his novel, Percival's Planet, which was inspired by the true story of Kansan and noted astronomer Clyde Tombaugh, discoverer of Pluto. Byers talk will be introduced by Steven A. Hawley, KU Professor of Physics and Astronomy and former NASA astronaut.

The Ballroom event will also feature a guided astronomy display including Tombaugh artifacts, presented from 6:30 p.m. by the KU Department of Physics and Astronomy. Following the talk, Michael Byers will sign his books. Click here to read a sample from his book, published in the New York Times.

The event will conclude with a telescope viewing session on the Kansas Union 6th floor deck (weather permitting).


Click the image to see more about Pluto.

I'll be there right after class!

Best,
Chris
Tags:
I just got back my students' teacher/course evaluations, and I had to share. For my English 362 (Foundations of Technical Writing) courses, my average numbers ranged from 4.53 to 4.89 - one of my best semesters yet! (A 4.0 is "agree" and 5.0 is "strongly agree" with the variety of evaluation points.) The Department Chair told me last year that these numbers are unprecedented for a 300-level course, which makes it feel even better.

English 362 is required for dozens of majors, so almost everyone enrolled has to take it rather than chooses to take it; for example: "I have been suggesting that people take this course with McKitterick even though I hate English," and "I have been putting off this course until my last semester because I don't care for English courses. Chris made it very interesting and applicable," to give you an idea of the attitude many of my students bring to bear. Other nice comments: "One of the most engaging instructors I've ever had, and he seemed to not only have a vested interest in your learning but also interest in you as a person," and "McKitterick is one of the best English professors and professors in general I've had at KU." Lots more like this, some a bit blush-worthy. This is the kind of thing that makes teaching worthwhile - and in a semester when I didn't feel that I was shining at 100% due to countless job-related stresses.

The "Science, Techology, and Society: Examining the Future Through a Science-Fiction Lens" course (English 507) that I co-teach with Physics Professor Philip Baringer is not required (though it's apparently now a recommended course in some majors), so it's not surprising that the scores were even higher. Ratings ranged from 4.63 to (drum roll) a perfect 5.0 - and several 4.9s (only one person marking "Agree"). Oddly, feedback was much briefer for this course, but we got comments such as this gem: "My favorite class of my college experience."

Oh, and last semester, I got this one: "And he's sexy." That one made me smile, too.

Hooray for student evaluations! This is what keeps us doing our kick-ass best semester after semester.

Chris
Tags:
I just got back my students' teacher/course evaluations, and I had to share. For my English 362 (Foundations of Technical Writing) courses, my average numbers ranged from 4.53 to 4.89 - one of my best semesters yet! (A 4.0 is "agree" and 5.0 is "strongly agree" with the variety of evaluation points.) The Department Chair told me last year that these numbers are unprecedented for a 300-level course, which makes it feel even better.

English 362 is required for dozens of majors, so almost everyone enrolled has to take it rather than chooses to take it; for example: "I have been suggesting that people take this course with McKitterick even though I hate English," and "I have been putting off this course until my last semester because I don't care for English courses. Chris made it very interesting and applicable," to give you an idea of the attitude many of my students bring to bear. Other nice comments: "One of the most engaging instructors I've ever had, and he seemed to not only have a vested interest in your learning but also interest in you as a person," and "McKitterick is one of the best English professors and professors in general I've had at KU." Lots more like this, some a bit blush-worthy. This is the kind of thing that makes teaching worthwhile - and in a semester when I didn't feel that I was shining at 100% due to countless job-related stresses.

The "Science, Techology, and Society: Examining the Future Through a Science-Fiction Lens" course (English 507) that I co-teach with Physics Professor Philip Baringer is not required (though it's apparently now a recommended course in some majors), so it's not surprising that the scores were even higher. Ratings ranged from 4.63 to (drum roll) a perfect 5.0 - and several 4.9s (only one person marking "Agree"). Oddly, feedback was much briefer for this course, but we got comments such as this gem: "My favorite class of my college experience."

Oh, and last semester, I got this one: "And he's sexy." That one made me smile, too.

Hooray for student evaluations! This is what keeps us doing our kick-ass best semester after semester.

Chris
Tags:




Seth Shostak, senior astronomer at the SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Institute and author of Confessions of an Alien Hunter [Amazon|Powell's], will discuss the possibility of contact and what it would mean to the world in "The Scientific Search for ET" at 7pm tonight, May 9, at Alderson Auditorium in the KU Kansas Union. It's free.

Shostak was on the Cobert Report last week. Check it out!

Also, he and Sara Seager (Associate Professor of Physics at MIT) were on KCUR's (Kansas City's public radio station) "Up to Date" program last week; go to the website if you want to listen to the podcast!

Click the image to see the KU News story.




Seth Shostak, senior astronomer at the SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Institute and author of Confessions of an Alien Hunter [Amazon|Powell's], will discuss the possibility of contact and what it would mean to the world in "The Scientific Search for ET" at 7pm tonight, May 9, at Alderson Auditorium in the KU Kansas Union. It's free.

Shostak was on the Cobert Report last week. Check it out!

Also, he and Sara Seager (Associate Professor of Physics at MIT) were on KCUR's (Kansas City's public radio station) "Up to Date" program last week; go to the website if you want to listen to the podcast!

Click the image to see the KU News story.
Just turned in a piece about the University of Kansas science-fiction library collections to Science Fiction Studies. Whew! That's the end of article-writing for... well, a few weeks, anyhow. Next: catch up on grading. Then: finish the next stage of revision on my novel, Transcendence, and work on cover design with [livejournal.com profile] ericreynolds. Then: back to articles for the online version of the World Literature Today SF issue.

Also fit in other stuff as time flies out of my bottom. Sometimes I think a vacation would be nice :-(|)

Chris
Tags:
Just turned in a piece about the University of Kansas science-fiction library collections to Science Fiction Studies. Whew! That's the end of article-writing for... well, a few weeks, anyhow. Next: catch up on grading. Then: finish the next stage of revision on my novel, Transcendence, and work on cover design with [livejournal.com profile] ericreynolds. Then: back to articles for the online version of the World Literature Today SF issue.

Also fit in other stuff as time flies out of my bottom. Sometimes I think a vacation would be nice :-(|)

Chris
Tags:
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